Sports Book Guy's Review of "Breaking Ground"

While not billed as a baseball book per se, the baseball passages are written well and from the point of view of a fan. Of course, all the baseball involves Robinson in some manner but that doesn’t matter. Because of the special skills Robinson brought to the baseball field, such as his speed, and the excitement rarely seen such as a steal of home plate, the baseball talk is very good. If a person just wanted to talk about Robinson with Lelchuk, these passages are very likely what he would tell that person..

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Brooklyn Book Ties Childhood With Jackie Robinson

First, it is an eyewitness memoir that captures in atmospheric detail the impact of Jackie’s very presence on Ebbets Field from the adoring eyes of a 9-year-old fan, who saw him play often. Second, it explains how Jackie’s special personality and play affected the borough of Brooklyn and changed it forever. Third, on a more personal level, “BREAKING GROUND” tells the story of how Jackie became an important figure inside the immigrant Lelchuk household, where a left-wing father, who had felt much hostility and estrangement from both America and his son, suddenly started to learn and understand the country of his son and of his own exile. “BREAKING GROUND” transports readers from the national baseball stage to the emergence of an iconic American city, from the throes and struggles of new immigrant family to a young boy’s deepest pleasures..

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Book review: Nostalgic and Satirical Look at the Past

If the title of the Rosenbaum’s novel makes you think of Jackie Gleason, that’s because it’s the catchphrase of the comedian whose name was once synonymous with Miami Beach. However, he’s only one of the real life characters to appear in the book. In 1972, when “How Sweet It Is” begins, Gleason is on the decline and the counterculture is on the uprise. The city faces two national conventions (Democrats and Republicans) that summer and the chief of police is determined not to repeat the fiasco of the 1968 Democratic one in Chicago. The focus of the work, though, is the Posner family – Holocaust survivors Sophie and Jacob Posner, and their 12-year-old son, Adam. In chapters that feel more like vignettes or short stories, rather than parts of a defined novel, Rosenbaum offers a clever, satirical look at Miami, with a slightly serious undercurrent.

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Beach Buzz: Rosenbaum will return to South Florida during November to promote his newest novel, How Sweet It Is!

Author Thane Rosenbaum grew up on Miami Beach. A novelist, essayist and law professor who currently lives in New York, Rosenbaum will return to South Florida during November to promote his newest novel, How Sweet It Is! The book — a comedic tale set in Miami Beach in 1972 — has been selected by the city of Miami Beach as the first book in its “One Book, One City” initiative, a pilot program designed to engage the community in literary conversations.

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